Living and Sustaining a Creative Life ~ Essays by 40 Working Artists, ~~ Thanks for sharing, Sharon Louden

In the box or out of the box?

To gallery or not to gallery — to quest or not to quest?

Shut up and pass paper and pencils. Art wants making.

For the book price of less than a dollar a piece, editor Sharon Louden, working artist herself,  invites artists, and any other interested parties, to engage with 40 working artists n what has been an ongoing discussion for as long as creative people have striven to live and thrive in a world at large that far too often is less than supportive of their existence. No, Living and Sustaining a Creative Life, Essays by 40 Working Artists isn’t a book about artists who rock the status quo of mainstream society. Though there are artists within these pages who do so in one medium or another.  What this very engaging tome offers is a very wide and diverse range of perspectives based on experiences had by artists who’ve found their own ways to survive, thrive and continue to create over time. There are discussions of quests for studio time,  for money to provide food, shelter and art supplies, for solitude and for companionship, gallery representation and new ways of making a go of things with and without galleries. There’s a lot of insight, hindsight, information, ideas and inspiration in these essays written by a very wide range of artists including those raising children and engaged in mutually supportive relationships. Plus, there is an excellent photograph of each artist’s work prefacing their essay. Yeah, that’s a very sweet bonus track in this book–you get some views of art you might or might not have seen yet. So this libro also serves as a visual catalog of artists as essayists. Hence, you get a small visual sense of what these artists invest so much vital energy and time creating.

A few of my visual treat picks:

Michael Waugh’s The American Jobs Act, part 1 (detail)

Peter Drake’s Day for Night

Thomas Kilpper’s State of Control

Maggie Michael’s Swans of Other Worlds ~  (photography by Dan Steinhilber)

Julie Hefferman’s Self Portrait as Big World

Jay Davis’ Please, no more birds

&

Living and Sustaining a Creative Life Panel ~ Book tour video.  Yes, this is an interesting and engaging serious discussion among artists, about artists, art and the art world. Enjoy.

 

Here’s a link to Amazon’s Look Inside page for the book – http://www.amazon.com/Living-Sustaining-Creative-Life-Working/dp/178320012X#reader_B00F4AT02K

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Here are just a few of my favorite quotes from the essays:

Annette Lawrence ~ “I am generally led by curiosity, and nothing is off-limits.”

George Stoll ~ “I LIke to work but don’t always like to start, so I make it as easy to begin as possible. At a restaurant near my house that has good coffee, friendly waiters and an owner who tolerates my long visits, I start most days. . . .  I’ve learned that I am especially productive when feeling a bit delinquent.”

Tony Ingrisano ~ “I sleep and eat and breathe drawing, so it’s only logical that I’d do anything necessary to keep drawing.”

Sean Mellyn ~ “Rauschenberg’s Bed made an early and lasting impression on me – that art can not only be made from anything, but material extrapolated from a life lived is a powerful statement.”

Brian Tolle ~ “There are no bad opportunities if you have only one.”

Austin Thomas ~ “There are as many ways to be an artist as there are artists; Lucas Reiner told me that one and it is true.”

Amy Pleasant ~ “And it wakes me up each day. And I follow it. And at the risk of sounding melodramatic, it is the greatest thing I know.”

Maggie Michael ~ “Falling n love was easy. What became labored was managing our bank account after college (when our student loans came due). Artists often pair with someone who has a reliable career and income, but we could not change partners now or in hindsight.”

Dan Steinhilber (Maggie Michael’s partner) ~ “Many people seem to give us extra credit because we involve our child in our life as artists. Clay has excellent conversational skills, yet he does not make a great deal of artworks. Nevertheless, he is imaginative and creative and amazing to us.”

Dan Steinhilber ~ “Over time we learned how to help, support, and appreciate each other rather than be competitive. For example, on days when Maggie is teaching, I often go to her studio and do practical things for her – build stretchers, prime canvases, and keep her supplies organized so that her time in the studio can be focused on painting.”

And

Link for Intellect, Publishers of Original Thinking page –>>   http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/books/view-Book,id=5042/

How do you measure success?

What did you create today?

Okay, now that I’ve done my good book information sharing deed for the day, it’s time to take advantage of the lull in the rain to get the box of sheet music out of the back seat and see what suits my agenda.

 

Red Wolf emerges from the woods

Something Poetic & Positive which I discovered via The Poetic Rabbit
at  http://www.tasmith1122.wordpress.com/  Shiteki Na Usagi. The art in the header art is the work of Leslie White who blogs at Leslie Paints   http://www.lesliepaints.wordpress.com/  ~~~ Red Wolf emerges caught my eye because of the ongoing attack on Wolves in America. This is just one example of exploring the interconnectedness of all things. Namaste.

We Write Poems

red wolf eyes
We’re excited to present you the Red Wolf collection, the first We Write Poems prompted-poem anthology.
 
This first anthology is the culmination of roughly three years of work – people writing poems in response to prompts presented at this site. So prompts and the Internet were the great enablers of the creative process by which these poems were written and shared.
 
The title of the anthology, “Red Wolf”, reflects the art banner of our site. We think it helps define who we are, who we want to be – poets who look to play a little dangerously, realizing the hungry teeth also of our natures, and with willingness in allowing risk. Real writing calls for nothing less. But then again, we’ve nothing against also having fun.
 
And because prompts played such an integral part in triggering the poems we write, we decided to feature the prompts…

View original post 294 more words

There are at least 125, and still counting, damn good reasons to go see Impressionist France at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

“Fields in the Month of June” by Charles-Francois Daubigny is one excellent reason to visit France via an art exhibition at a museum in the American midwestern state of Missouri, the Nelson-Atkins. Who knew there was great art in and flowing through Kansas City, the home of a basically defunct public school district? Ouch, irony’s knife-edge is getting a tad sharp these days. No matter, the point of this missive is the wonderful art that has come to visit from October 19, 2013  to February 9, 2014.  The sheer size of “Fields in the Month of June” surprised me, as did the dimensions of a number of the other pieces you often view in print and sometimes online.  There are the LARGE Daubigny and Dore pieces to a small round photograph of a local regional girl in this exhibition. This serves as a certain metaphor for the entire show–large scope rendered with precise attention paid to small details in the same way painters used photographs to enhance their depictions of whatever was catching their image loving eyes. It’s all absolutely delicious eye feasting as far as I’m concerned.

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http://www.charles-francois-daubigny.org/145033/Fields-in-the-Month-of-June-normal.jpg

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The number one reason, in my opinion: Gustave Dore’s “Deer In a Pine Forest” (Vosges) 1865.  Which seems to have disappeared from cyberspace since I first found a version of it to serve as a tempting main course.  In lieu of that incredible image itself, just toss the red figure out of the image below, darken the light, heighten the trees, give the huge painting a wall to own all by itself and you’ll have some notion of why Dore’s painting alone is worth paying the price of admission to the current exhibition at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art: Impressionist France, Visions of Nation From Le Gray to Monet. Note: “Figures by a Woodland Stream,” shown below, is not on display. But it gives a decent notion of the painting that you can almost walk right into-though I wouldn’t turn my toes out of this one either. No way.

The exhibition concentrates on mid 19th century France’s city-scapes, forests, rural areas, trains, water-scapes, artists and the people they painted–no, not the wealthy upper classes wanting their fashionable personages preserved for posterity, but such as “Washerwomen of the Breton Coast,” 1870 by Jules Breton. Oh, yes, the washerwomen are another major reason to catch this exhibition. There’s also Breton’s “The Wounded Seagull,” 1878 and his wonderful take on his wife, “Elodie With a Sunshade”; Bay of Dourarnenez (Woman with Parasol), 1870-71.  Hmm, yes, I took a fancy to Breton’s paintings.  He has a way with the ladies’ eyes and how they engage the viewer.  The Mona Lisa smirks. So what. She’s getting her face done by a painter while she sits around doing nothing except, possibly considering the recent gossip regarding sexual scandals. Breton’s women are not passive objects of affectation. They’re engaged in the landscapes in which they’re consciously inhabiting. They’re magnificent in their own right.  Men make war. Women wash clothes. Which one really keeps the world in some state worth living in? So, got it, Jules Breton’s Women are another major reason to see this art show.

Here’s another major reason to go to the art show: a Wet-plate Field Camera w/ Dallinger lens, tripod and equipment from France circa 1870s. For all you digital camera junkies, this huge field camera is a sight to behold. Imagine hauling around over one hundred pounds of wood, glass, metal and what all else in order to take a few pictures. It’s a magnificent specimen of artistic creation you can walk around–no touching allowed–and imagine getting yourself up close to “click” this huge beast’s “buttons.” Yeah, dream on. The products of such burdensome camera beasts are also in evidence in this exhibition–and they are dazzlers in their own rights. Gustave  Le Grey’s “Factory,” Terre-Noire, 1851-55, Joseph Vigier’s “Saint Sauveur, Port de Sia, Gavarnie Route,” 1853, along with the photos of Charles Nigre and the unknown photographer Giraudons Artist offer much for the eye and the intellect to consider of times and people long gone, yet glimpsed because these men turned their huge cameras’ lens towards them and pulled the imaging trigger.

Oh and there’s Berthe Morisot’s “The Harbor at Lorient,” 1869. It’s a wonderful study in light, water, white, blues and browns all rendered in the bright light of day with her sister dressed in white. It’s a gorgeous work displayed with some seascapes depicting some seaside people notions modern bikini bathers may find incomprehensible. Those are by the usual Impressionist guys.

Of course you’ll get your fix of Monet and Manet–with more of each in the permanent collection on display for nada all the time.  But you will also get to meet and greet some artists you might not think of when wanting to wade into the famous “Waterlilies.” Discover Frederic Bazille, represented by his “Porte de la Reine at Aigues-Mortes,” 1867–a depiction of a 13th century gate to the city. There’s Paul Huet’s beautifully rendered lighting in “The Ruins of the Chataeu of Pierrefonds,” 1867-68. Yes, there are more than a few castles in temporary residence and they’re wonderfully depicted, complete with splashes of red and white to draw attention to the local people en route to other places beyond the paintings’ scopes.

This is a show about context of place and the place is France from her seashores to her Alps–and what a showing it is in the darkened exhibition area with plenty of something for everyone’s taste palette, in my view. There are bright lights, muted atmospheres, and quiet farm scenes complete with bovines.  There are even some digitalized art books of glaciers and river scenes. The large and weighty originals rest under glass while your oily human fingers get to flip the their contemporary counterparts by running your fingertips across the glass. What a wonderful statement about the evolution of the photographic art form this is all by itself.

A very nice feature of this show is that once your ticket is bought you can enter and linger as long as you like, go forage for food, and return for another go around the exhibition as often as you care to –on the same day, of course. This isn’t set up to be a line of pushers and shovers roped off from the offerings. You can wander and loiter through the thoughtfully walled spaces with whatever engages your heart and mind–including the pieces on the prehistoric forests which no longer exist as they once did. Theodore Rousseau’s “The Rock Oak” (Forest at Forentainbleus), 1860-67.

One other very lovely surprise for me was a delightfully refreshing street scene of blues, greens and whites by Renoir, “The Grand Boulevard,” 1875. It is simply gorgeous. Go see the exhibition paths for yourself. What are you waiting for? France to come to you? This is about as close to that as you’ll get. But don’t forget, most of these images are long gone. If not for the artists, they wouldn’t exist.

Oops, I almost forgot, in this exhibit there are 125 pieces to view. That’s 125 reasons to go, at the very least.  Every reason thereafter is icing on the French Impressionist Cake Walk.

Impressionist France at the Nelson-Atkins

http://www.nelson-atkins.org/art/exhibitions/impressionist-france.cfm

Spencer Art Library Guide
Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet

http://www.nelson-atkins.org/images/PDF/Education/Library/2013_Impressionist%20France.pdf

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Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet

Folk Songs for Climate Justice

Have a listen to Otter Creek’s “Bidder 70”  at  http://music.peacefuluprising.org/releases

There are 14 songs available for download in most formats. Listening is FREE. Modest fee for downloading.

Want to sing with the bees? Visit a waterfall? Deal with the Devil? Play with Petroleum People?

The lyrics are inspiring,  lovely and honest. The audio is perfect.  Downloading is simple.

Get some joy now. What are you waiting for?  Go listen and find some heart.

“What if this moment was the only thing that mattered?” from Steve Bassett’s “Surrender”.

The Dark Mountain Project — Uncivilisation Festival 15-18 August — Care for a little taste of reality? It’s the end of the world as we know it . . . .

OOh how about a little walk on the DARK side of reality? Hmm? How about a visit to The Dark Mountain? Why not? Turn yourself around, inside out, and upside down a few times and let the imagination marbles roll where they will. What’s an Uncivilisation Festival? Smile. No, it’s not Mad Max down under fun and games. Hardly. But you know, the Brothers Grimm just might have been interested……

The machine is stuttering and the engineers are in panic. They are wondering if perhaps they do not understand it as well as they imagined. They are wondering whether they are controlling it at all or whether, perhaps, it is controlling them.’

– From Uncivilisation: the Dark Mountain Manifesto

The Dark Mountain Project is a network of writers, artists and thinkers who have stopped believing the stories our civilisation tells itself. We see that the world is entering an age of ecological collapse, material contraction and social and political unravelling, and we want our cultural responses to reflect this reality rather than denying it.

The Project grew out of a feeling that contemporary art and literature were failing to respond honestly or adequately to the scale of our entwined ecological, economic and social crises. We believe that writing and art have a crucial role to play in coming to terms with this reality, and in questioning its foundations.

[note: wp, my computer, the ‘machine at large’ are not cooperating with the production of this post regarding quotes, indents, or images. I apologize for any infractions that result from the posting of this information. Cheerio.]

 

Info via Paul Kingsnorth, whose new book I’ve supported via Unbound, has a new post on the blog, “If You Go Down to the Woods Today”. regarding the upcoming final Uncivilisation Festival. Anyone interested in another way of living and perceiving our world and its future may want to skip down the cyber rabbit hole and see what’s up in jolly old England near Petersfield, Hampshire. Or if you’ve just got some sweet kitty kitty mojo curiosity drop yourself in for a look around The Dark Mountain Project page where Kingsnorth’s blog is posted http://dark-mountain.net/blog/if-you-go-down-to-the-woods-today

As posted on the page:

“Tickets are selling fast for our fourth – and last! – Uncivilisation festival. Uncivilistion 2013 takes place from 15-18 August. Visit the festival website for more details.”

 

Paul Kingsnorth’s book, The Wake, on Unbound http://unbound.co.uk/books/the-wake

“The play’s the thing….” Or is it the barn? — Some players come from barns, hence, The Barn Players. Six plays for $10. Hay not included.

Click to visit.

 

Looking for some very affordable quality entertainment? Well, The Barn Players just might have something that will satisfy your drama quest this December at the their festival.  What would you do with ten minutes of stage time to play at will? Hmm? Any playwrights out there itching for a Shakey Will Spearing? Hmm?

Graffiti Tattoo, vol.2 = Gorgeous Global Great Body Art Galore!

    While I sport no tattoo art on my own skin nor have I yet converted a public surface to a canvas I have great respect and admiration for artists who do so with bold creativity and style.  Yeah, I ‘get’ the mainstream culture’s issues with the “illegal art” of graffiti and I render that about as much credibility as I do the notion of human beings being “illegal.” Shouldn’t great art increase the property value of a building or other surface that has been chosen as an artist’s canvas? I’ve seen many a bland brick wall transformed into bright beautiful living color that brings art out of climate controlled galleries and into the everyday lives of everyone with eyes willing to appreciate it.  As for tattoo artists whom people entrust with their own hides for spreading ink–I’m continually impressed with their inventive ways of collaborating with the human form.  It’s not a requirement to pursue either art form in order to enjoy what they offer.  Even if you’re just mildly curious I highly encourage you to sneak a peek between the covers of Graffiti Tattoo, vol. 2 by Alan Ket and Don Karl aka Stone. They’ll take you around the world via introductions of tattoo artists with graffiti backgrounds who work with skin and ink from Oakland, CA to Queensland, Australia.  One of my favorites is Fishero from Ostrava in the Czech Republic.  I adore his incredible illusions of 3D art.  Each artist speaks for him/herself about their art and personal history. Contact and online information are provided for each artist:  websites, Facebook, emails and addresses. Yes, if you’re wandering about Copenhagen, Denmark, you can get some ink from Franz Jager. Marco Wagner aka Sheas can be found at Lucky Six Tattoo in Berlin, Germany. Eaz One tweets from San Jose, California. Turkesa is in Barcelona, Spain.   This photographic record is lush and brilliantly vibrant.  The book offers a means for viewing the global scale of arts of workaday world people. The art is as varied as the artists’ thoughts on mentoring, writing, images, drawing and life.  It’s great out of the box art all around offering trains, the Pieta, Sitting Bull, skulls, dragons and much much more.  See for yourself at From Here to Fame Publishing http://www.fromheretofame.com/books/tattoo2.html

To visit Fishero online –>> http://www.freihand.cz/news.php

Click image to see what’s between the covers.

Kansas City FilmFest 2011–Entries Call!

Kansas City FilmFest 2011 – Call for Entries – Our 15th year celebrating independent filmmaking.Presented by the Kansas City Filmmakers Jubilee

All filmmakers, anywhere, are invited to submit your short or feature film – drama, comedy, documentary, animation, or experimental work. It must have been completed since January 1, 2009.

DEADLINE DATE:  SEPTEMBER 15, 2010  (Other deadlines: 12/15/2010, 1/15/2011 & 2/04/2011) 

ENTRY FEES:  Vary by short or feature and increase with each new deadline date

SAVE $5 on your entry fee by UPLOADING your screener to our secure website and save on postage too. If you prefer to send us a copy – SEND your screener (DVD-region 1), check, entry form to: KC Jubilee, 4826 W. 77th Terrace, Prairie Village, KS 66208-4321

EARN $5 for each filmmaker you get to submit a film. JOIN our Jubilee Affiliate Program. CLICK HERE to sign up!

Go to our website – kcjubilee.org– for complete details, entry form, and pay fee online. You may also submit through WAB.

Check out our special CinemaJAZZ division if you have made a work (short or feature) inspired by JAZZ

Kansas City FilmFest is scheduled for April 6-10, 2011.  

Visiting filmmakers will include – Andy Anderson, Elvis Mitchell

Jurors will include senior programmers from Sundance, Slamdance, SXSW, and the Toronto International Film Festival. 

If you have any questions – call   913-649-0244 or email: kcjub@kcjubilee.org

Science Meets Art and Aboating Ye Go

                              http://www.artistboat.org/index.html

If you’re an artist with a penchant for paddling kayaks or a scientist swimming in watercolors, you may find this Galveston, Texas based group’s educational and awareness efforts of interest.  Artist Boat is a non-profit that educates children about the environment using art and science.  Oh yeah watercolors and water-testing in the same boat.

painting states

eagerly awaiting the times of unseeing

studio alleyways, railroad cars, forgotten spaces

canned colors in hand

to paint is o conduct a pre-emptive strike

beware Franco

open air galleries

no entry fees everyone sees

 the true heirs of Art?

Guernica’s legacy?

no so fast

testimony to their ever-presence

flows along the sewer streets of Pompeii

  @wojcik

 Thanks to The Juicer for inspiration. http://bigapplejuice.wordpress.com/

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