Dispatch from the Kansas City, (MO not KS) Metropolitan Area ala City By City

Hola fellow web travelers. As a follow-up to my return to the online world I thought I’d connect with my prior post by filling in a gap in the City By City Dispatches from the American Metropolis edited by Keith Gessen and Stephen Squibb with a snapshot of Kansas City, Missouri–with a few side notes regarding some areas PR people like to associate it with, and some it would rather forget exist too close for their comfortably red-lined zones. Please don’t take this missive as a criticism of City By City. Editors have to work with the material they’re given and I am certainly enjoying its varied dispatches from Detroit, Washington D.C. (a brothel, how deliciously appropriate), and Chicago’s Hyde Park. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if Gessen and Squibb either received no dispatches from Kansas City or if they did they couldn’t figure out what to make of them. The latter would be very understandable as Kansas City, Missouri has multiple personalities. Which one you encounter depends entirely on where you are–literally–physically.

If you were to stand on the corner of midtown Kansas City at 39th and Main Street, ground zero for KKFI, a community radio station like none other, your view of Kansas City changes drastically depending on which direction you take from there. Go south and west for money, some of it old and resting very comfortably. North offers old ethnic neighborhoods like Little Italy, and the City Market area working at staying alive north of the infamous Independence Avenue line (former hunting grounds for serial killers). Go east towards the Troost line you’ll find neighborhoods locked in life and death struggles with poverty and crime while contending with everything from a tragically failed public school district to abandoned vacant houses, gangs, and violent crime.

Heading west on 39th Street will take you to what remains of the city’s midtown bohemian neighborhoods. The ghost of the New York style D’Bronx pizzeria haunts the south corner of 39th and Bell while Prospero’s Books holds down the fort directly opposite it on the northern corner. Behind the 39th Street mainly food business line-up is a crowd of densely packed homes of all makes and ages. It’s a cool crazy quilt of unpredictability. Continue westward and you’ll cross State Line and then you’re in the KU Med area–which is on the Kansas side of the street, not in Missouri. Though you might never guess it. PR people like to make the most of what’s good around them.

If you travel south down Main and 39th to Westport Road you’ll wind up in the increasingly yuppified Westport area which currently caters to people who enjoy imbibing copious amounts of the legal drug known as alcohol in their free time. Long gone is the classy independent bookstore, the unique clothing stores, the movie theater and many other business venues unconnected to providing watering holes for the young and senseless. To be fair, the heroic Broadway Cafe remains steadfast on Broadway. As far as I currently know it is the ONLY independent coffeehouse to drive out the invasive species known as Starbucks. Yep, that’s right. Corporate Starbucks came, saw and invaded–and departed without conquering the superior java product. Also, the incredible Tivoli Cinemas remains–after relocating to Pennsylvania Ave. There’s also a newer food gig in the area–a new version of The Corner Restaurant complete with goat cheese, kale and alligator. No bagels and lox there–no way. The area has completely lost the feel of a friendly and engaging one-stop contained neighborhood but it is still alive, though steadily losing the remains of its inviting personality. I still mourn the closing of its independent music store, Streetside Records, which was once a great place to explore an incredibly wide range of music. It’s where I purchased Joan Osborne’s Relish after listening and discovering it offered far more than “If God Was One of Us.” Unless you’re into the drunk and disorderly scene evade the area on the weekends after dark when the partying begins in earnest as there are multiple hardcore drinking establishments all within a minute’s walk of each other from the corner of Pennsylvania and Westport Road. If you’re into drunk and disorderly then by all means go wallow whole hog all night long.

If you continue further south on Broadway you will enter the alternate universe of The Plaza where the fountains flow and so does the money dough. It’s not called the Country Club Plaza for nothing. Years and years ago this was an upscale middle class yet still affordable area with all kinds of interesting independent shops and food venues. These days it caters to those with two hundred dollars to spend on jeans without batting an eye. Dinner can easily cost a hundred dollars a person at some eateries. Most of the affordable housing in this area has vanished, but there’s plenty to be had for the urban condo set. The Plaza offers Thanksgiving lights, fountains, a very uninspiring insipid Art Fair–art which will not offend, raise issues or stretch anyone’s mind–but it’ll work well with your color scheme. So ironic considering the fact that just a few blocks away rests the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art–well, maybe not so ironic other things considered. If you desire more engaging on the fringe art then go north from 39th and Main to the Crossroads area around Broadway and 18th Streets. But visit it fast because the high and mighty are digging in big time with developments with hopes to connect the dots to the Power and Light District (Remind me: urban revitalization for who? Yuppies? Again?) and the real people character is vanishing fast. You’ll know the former Crossroads has been entirely vanquished when YJ’s Snack Bar closes and the jamming ends. Yep, that will signal the end of an era.

Okay,so venturing southwest from The Plaza and you’ll find impressive homes on lots large enough for five or six of the houses east of Troost Ave. None of them will have their garbage or household discards left sitting at curb for weeks and weeks and weeks as happens in the neighborhoods east of Troost where, if you’re not squeamish, you can have your pick of couches, mattresses, and entertainment centers. Even the huge lovely Loose Park is very well maintained. There’s cool green space galore with huge old trees, a pond, picnic areas and rose garden. I wonder if anyone east of Troost ever enters the rose garden contest held at Loose Park? I’ve never seen roses blooming in the parks east of Troost. Seeing a bench to sit on is a find. This is part of the character of extreme contrasts that Kansas City offers. This can easily be missed by staying on the highways when driving in from Independence, Missouri–a former Meth Lab Capital of the World–though who knows what’s really going on in that American drug swamp. If you drive into Kansas City from Independence on any residential street like 23rd or 31st instead of I70 you’ll get a close up view of the multiple urban landscapes of Kansas City from the bottom of the economic ladder to the top from east to west/southwest. You might even be impressed by the bus-stop at the corner of 31st and Troost–it does look like something from this decade, sort of.

Heading south from The Plaza, or from 31st and Troost, you’ll find the University of Missouri which years ago ran into very deep shit with its very diverse residential neighbors when it embarked on a buy and destroy mission to enable expansion of the parking garage ilk–among other things. The good neighbors fought back hard, going so far as to threaten UMKC’s chancellor’s residence with a bulldozer. No joke, these people were pissed off and rightly so in my opinion. Along Rockhill Road were blocks of lawn signs screaming “UMKC Kills Homes.” So much for the Ivory Tower’s idealism when it comes to money matters. This is another area in which the small independent local business flavor has all but disappeared. Perhaps they just don’t make people the same anymore? Just a question. Rockhill Road leads to Brookside and Waldo areas where the older tree-lined streets are narrow and generally quiet and the grocery store offers delights you won’t find in Wild Woody’s store east of Troost on 31 Street. Lamb chops and Green Tea ice cream anyone? Hmm?

Troost Avenue is only one block east of Rockhill Road. Once you get past being impressed by Rockhurst University’s presence on the east side of the street it’s clear straight off that the residences are not on par with those to the west of UMKC. Things are a tad rougher and tougher looking on the east side of Troost for the hard-working poor and their attendant gangs. Just a tad. I don’t think I’ve ever been in another city with such an obvious social economic division designated by a single street running north/south where you can actually stand on the street’s yellow dividing line and see two contrasting worlds just by looking in opposite directions: urban blight versus urban de-light.

I haven’t said anything about barbecue. Yeah, there’s plenty of it in all directions.
Nor have I mentioned the Historic Jazz District at 18th and Vine which is one street featuring the wonderful Gem Theater, the Blue Room and the American Jazz Museum, The Call newspaper–and historic painted storefronts.
Then there’s the Northeast area of Kansas City with its incredible influx of immigrants whose language needs the Kansas City Public library tries to address with ESL courses.
I haven’t mentioned the former mayor who refused to discuss the state of education even when it was front page news.
I haven’t mentioned the ex-school superintendent who insisted that 36 students in a classroom was a good thing.
Nor have I said anything about the decline of a newspaper that first impressed me with its coverage of a suspected serial killer hunting prostitutes and other vulnerable women on Independence Ave.
I’ve only hinted at the vibrant art scene that serves as a huge street party every first Friday.
There are thousands of homeless people in Kansas City.

There’s extreme wealth in Kansas City–and that’s not counting Johnson County which is in KANSAS not Missouri–and there’s extreme poverty with every economic class in between. I wonder if the people working at the Channel 4 news station ever drove down the street right behind their building and saw the houses with plastic sheeting for windows? Yes, there were people living in those places.

I could write a great deal more. I’m trying to stop while I’m ahead. I suspect I might already be behind the eight ball here.

Perhaps the very best thing about Kansas City is the community radio station which is still going strong after more than twenty years of Jazz, Blues, World, Folk, Classical, Latino, Reggae, and Rock music. If anything is truly alive and well in Kansas City, Missouri, it is KKFI–the beating heart of a diverse population which can’t be red lined. If you want a taste of Kansas City then tune in–they’re streaming online world-wide from the corner of 39th and Main 365 days and nights a year.

KKFI

City By City

Get Your Jazz Fix Free From KKFI

I swear this is not a bait and switch stunt. Jazz lovers can indeed grab some great Jazz every Monday through Friday from 1-3 pm streaming online via KKFI http://www.kkfi.org/  . Go ahead and surf the link to a great independent community radio station without any corporate suits and ties. Wherever you are in the world, if you can read this blog then you can catch two full hours of jazz programs hosted by working Jazz artists and lovers like Jeff Harshbarger, KC, the Jazz Geek, the Jazz Insider, and the Jazz Disciple. For direct specs on program guides –>> http://www.kkfi.org/program-categories/music/jazz/ .  This is not your standard radio listening experience. The programs change daily. You might hear Jazz at other hours. There are no paid promotion spots. These programs are labors of love for Jazz in its many forms from the past to the present.  KKFI’s Jazz programs offer interviews with  current working Jazz artists, historical information, a gig calendar of who is playing where and when around the Kansas City area, and incredible music all for free. Though for a donation they’ll even let you be a “Guest DJ” ~ for more info –> http://www.kkfi.org/support/guest-dj/ .

You can even sign up for information about forthcoming live recording performances at The Blue Room at 18th and Vine.

Now, if you’re not in a surfing link frame of mind–here’s some piano beauty from Bill Evans.

Bill Evans Trio ~ Blue in Green —

Thanks to Burningable for this and other great music on YouTube.

Bruningable

Album: Portrait in Jazz (1959) Bill Evans: piano, Scott LaFaro: bass, Paul Motian: drums; Composition: Bill Evans
Recorded on December 28, 1959, NYC

There’s more of Bill Evans posted on the sidebar to the left.

Enjoy.

If your ears are privy to other online streaming radio programs featuring Jazz, please share a link via the comments.

Jazz goes everywhere around the world via KKFI.

There are at least 125, and still counting, damn good reasons to go see Impressionist France at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

“Fields in the Month of June” by Charles-Francois Daubigny is one excellent reason to visit France via an art exhibition at a museum in the American midwestern state of Missouri, the Nelson-Atkins. Who knew there was great art in and flowing through Kansas City, the home of a basically defunct public school district? Ouch, irony’s knife-edge is getting a tad sharp these days. No matter, the point of this missive is the wonderful art that has come to visit from October 19, 2013  to February 9, 2014.  The sheer size of “Fields in the Month of June” surprised me, as did the dimensions of a number of the other pieces you often view in print and sometimes online.  There are the LARGE Daubigny and Dore pieces to a small round photograph of a local regional girl in this exhibition. This serves as a certain metaphor for the entire show–large scope rendered with precise attention paid to small details in the same way painters used photographs to enhance their depictions of whatever was catching their image loving eyes. It’s all absolutely delicious eye feasting as far as I’m concerned.

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http://www.charles-francois-daubigny.org/145033/Fields-in-the-Month-of-June-normal.jpg

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The number one reason, in my opinion: Gustave Dore’s “Deer In a Pine Forest” (Vosges) 1865.  Which seems to have disappeared from cyberspace since I first found a version of it to serve as a tempting main course.  In lieu of that incredible image itself, just toss the red figure out of the image below, darken the light, heighten the trees, give the huge painting a wall to own all by itself and you’ll have some notion of why Dore’s painting alone is worth paying the price of admission to the current exhibition at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art: Impressionist France, Visions of Nation From Le Gray to Monet. Note: “Figures by a Woodland Stream,” shown below, is not on display. But it gives a decent notion of the painting that you can almost walk right into-though I wouldn’t turn my toes out of this one either. No way.

The exhibition concentrates on mid 19th century France’s city-scapes, forests, rural areas, trains, water-scapes, artists and the people they painted–no, not the wealthy upper classes wanting their fashionable personages preserved for posterity, but such as “Washerwomen of the Breton Coast,” 1870 by Jules Breton. Oh, yes, the washerwomen are another major reason to catch this exhibition. There’s also Breton’s “The Wounded Seagull,” 1878 and his wonderful take on his wife, “Elodie With a Sunshade”; Bay of Dourarnenez (Woman with Parasol), 1870-71.  Hmm, yes, I took a fancy to Breton’s paintings.  He has a way with the ladies’ eyes and how they engage the viewer.  The Mona Lisa smirks. So what. She’s getting her face done by a painter while she sits around doing nothing except, possibly considering the recent gossip regarding sexual scandals. Breton’s women are not passive objects of affectation. They’re engaged in the landscapes in which they’re consciously inhabiting. They’re magnificent in their own right.  Men make war. Women wash clothes. Which one really keeps the world in some state worth living in? So, got it, Jules Breton’s Women are another major reason to see this art show.

Here’s another major reason to go to the art show: a Wet-plate Field Camera w/ Dallinger lens, tripod and equipment from France circa 1870s. For all you digital camera junkies, this huge field camera is a sight to behold. Imagine hauling around over one hundred pounds of wood, glass, metal and what all else in order to take a few pictures. It’s a magnificent specimen of artistic creation you can walk around–no touching allowed–and imagine getting yourself up close to “click” this huge beast’s “buttons.” Yeah, dream on. The products of such burdensome camera beasts are also in evidence in this exhibition–and they are dazzlers in their own rights. Gustave  Le Grey’s “Factory,” Terre-Noire, 1851-55, Joseph Vigier’s “Saint Sauveur, Port de Sia, Gavarnie Route,” 1853, along with the photos of Charles Nigre and the unknown photographer Giraudons Artist offer much for the eye and the intellect to consider of times and people long gone, yet glimpsed because these men turned their huge cameras’ lens towards them and pulled the imaging trigger.

Oh and there’s Berthe Morisot’s “The Harbor at Lorient,” 1869. It’s a wonderful study in light, water, white, blues and browns all rendered in the bright light of day with her sister dressed in white. It’s a gorgeous work displayed with some seascapes depicting some seaside people notions modern bikini bathers may find incomprehensible. Those are by the usual Impressionist guys.

Of course you’ll get your fix of Monet and Manet–with more of each in the permanent collection on display for nada all the time.  But you will also get to meet and greet some artists you might not think of when wanting to wade into the famous “Waterlilies.” Discover Frederic Bazille, represented by his “Porte de la Reine at Aigues-Mortes,” 1867–a depiction of a 13th century gate to the city. There’s Paul Huet’s beautifully rendered lighting in “The Ruins of the Chataeu of Pierrefonds,” 1867-68. Yes, there are more than a few castles in temporary residence and they’re wonderfully depicted, complete with splashes of red and white to draw attention to the local people en route to other places beyond the paintings’ scopes.

This is a show about context of place and the place is France from her seashores to her Alps–and what a showing it is in the darkened exhibition area with plenty of something for everyone’s taste palette, in my view. There are bright lights, muted atmospheres, and quiet farm scenes complete with bovines.  There are even some digitalized art books of glaciers and river scenes. The large and weighty originals rest under glass while your oily human fingers get to flip the their contemporary counterparts by running your fingertips across the glass. What a wonderful statement about the evolution of the photographic art form this is all by itself.

A very nice feature of this show is that once your ticket is bought you can enter and linger as long as you like, go forage for food, and return for another go around the exhibition as often as you care to –on the same day, of course. This isn’t set up to be a line of pushers and shovers roped off from the offerings. You can wander and loiter through the thoughtfully walled spaces with whatever engages your heart and mind–including the pieces on the prehistoric forests which no longer exist as they once did. Theodore Rousseau’s “The Rock Oak” (Forest at Forentainbleus), 1860-67.

One other very lovely surprise for me was a delightfully refreshing street scene of blues, greens and whites by Renoir, “The Grand Boulevard,” 1875. It is simply gorgeous. Go see the exhibition paths for yourself. What are you waiting for? France to come to you? This is about as close to that as you’ll get. But don’t forget, most of these images are long gone. If not for the artists, they wouldn’t exist.

Oops, I almost forgot, in this exhibit there are 125 pieces to view. That’s 125 reasons to go, at the very least.  Every reason thereafter is icing on the French Impressionist Cake Walk.

Impressionist France at the Nelson-Atkins

http://www.nelson-atkins.org/art/exhibitions/impressionist-france.cfm

Spencer Art Library Guide
Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet

http://www.nelson-atkins.org/images/PDF/Education/Library/2013_Impressionist%20France.pdf

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Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet

Shout Out! To KCPT and ALL PBS viewers. Share your mind with KCPT about pulling the film “Citizen Koch” from the air.

Hello KCPT,

We, your viewers,  really want to see “Citizen Koch.” It should not have been pulled off the air. The public has a right to see the documentary and the station should not be fearful of upsetting the Koch brothers.

Public television should be used to inform us; that was the purpose of Independent Lens, was it not?

If you watch PBS, please call for the national showing of this important documentary.

That’s why I signed a petition to KCPT Public Television Station, which says:

“I think the public has a right to view the film “Citizen Koch.” We are requesting you to please show this film. Koch money shouldn’t influence what we can or can’t see aired on our PBS station.”

Will you sign the petition too? Click here to add your name:

http://petitions.moveon.org/workingfamilies/sign/kcpt-kansas-city-air?source=s.fwd&r_by=642703

The people of Wisconsin have not given up. Why should the rest of us?

 

Raise your voice, Tweet, Facebook and reblog at will. Please help fight media control.

Thanks!

‘Fruitvale Station’ is now showing at Tivoli Cinemas in Kansas City, Missouri.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello folks. As far as I can presently determine, the ONLY movie theater in Kansas City, Missouri currently offering ‘Fruitvale Station’ is the independently owned Tivoli Cinemas. Hats off to Tivoli’s  Jerry Harrington for bringing the film to Kansas City, Missouri. There’s a reason why this non-chain theatre continues to exist amidst all the big box chains and this is one of them–it brings things to us that we’d never otherwise get to see until they’re in little red envelopes.

 

Without further ado by moi:

Now Playing July 26 – August 1, 2013

2013 Sundance Grand Jury & Audience Award Winner
“FOUR STARS” – Kansas CIty Star
FRUITVALE STATION
RATED R  •  RUNNING TIME 1:25

FRI – SUN:  1:00, 3:15, 5:30 & 7:45
MON – THUR:  1:00, 3:15, 5:30 & 7:45

BUY TICKETS  | Watch Trailer

 

Discover Tivoli Cinemas  –>> http://www.tivolikc.com/

If anyone knows of another movie theater featuring ‘Fruitvale Station’ at this time in Kansas City, Missouri, please share where and leave a link in a comment.  There may be one because it is not designated as an “exclusive” on Tivoli Cinema’s website as is “A Highjacking”.  Thank you.

 

 

 

The Urban Farming Guys — “It Get’s Real in the Hood! Crazy!”

 

The video says it ALL.

Another world IS possible! A better world where people grow gardens and feed each other with love and caring.

Chasing Ice + Cafe Mocha + Climate Change + Cyberspace + Cinema = Chatty

Chasing Ice website http://www.chasingice.com/  Complete with link to James Balog’s photography and much more.

With all the ways there are to share information and communicate in this time of technological multitasking galore “mail” remains a constant source as both snail mail (those hard copies that are deposited in your own private hard copy mailboxes) and email (all the electronically created and delivered “soft” efforts to communicate via cyberspace complete with “in boxes” and mailing options. Anyone else recall the attempt by the American government to charge US all five cents per email we sent? Have I got that right? So far that effort to get a slice of the internet mail pie has failed. So far. I think. I may be wrong about this failure to milk us.).  Why do we so enjoy getting all our forms of “mail”? One reason I enjoy my mail is because of the information it brings to my attention that I may well have otherwise missed or overlooked or simply never discovered. There is something to be said for “subscribing” to business websites for updates and notifications. Are you all bored and wondering what the heck any of this has to do with the Chasing Ice video? Okay. I subscribe to the Tivoli Cinemas in Westport (an area of Kansas City, Missouri) and as a result I receive a weekly email regarding which films are being shown and when at the hard copy theatre complete with big screens, comfy seats, and the rare option to buy or bring your own yum yums for consumption while viewing all sorts of films. If I  did not have this subscription I probably would never have known that Chasing Ice is appearing exclusively at the Tivoli for the Kansas City area. Heck, I might not have even known it was appearing in any theatres if not for this email.  Luckily the Tivoli is within reasonable driving distance for moi–who, as you’ve all guessed by now has the “yappy yaps” this morning.

Tivoli Cinemas’ website  http://www.tivolikc.com/

Chasing Ice opens December 21, 2012. http://www.tivolikc.com/upcoming.html

Hey, they’re even offering The Nutcracker performed by the Royal London Ballet on December 23.  Yes, a movie theatre will show a ballet film. If that’s not enough to raise your highbrows a notch or two then maybe The Royal Opera of London show of The Marriage of Figaro on December 30 will do the trick.

Oh and a film ticket stub will knock 50% off the price of one drink at the Broadway Cafe –which, in my opinion, offers The Best Cafe Mocha–bar none– anywhere. Definitely the best I’ve tasted in several states. (No, sorry, folks trying to staff the little upstart coffee shop in Pierre, SD, that’s not a legit cafe mocha you’re proffering. Not yet anyway. Keep trying though. Practice may pay off in time.) Broadway Cafe site http://www.broadwayroasting.com/

So, guess where I will venture, safe driving conditions being extant, during the week of December 21-27? Yep. I’ll be chasing Chasing Ice with a delicious cafe mocha accompanied by a honey soaked croissant.  I’ll be enjoying what this world offers while it lasts.

Now, about all the ice chasing and film festival awards and climate change etc. . . .

The Incredible Winter Wonderland Coat Project!

from Yi-Ching Lin’s “waking up new” album

Tis the season of snow, wind, rain and cold for those of us without warm sandy beaches under our feet.  Tis the season of shopping too. Many folks use the gift giving holy days to update clothing needs for growing children.  In the Kansas City Metro area there’s a yearly winter clothing drive–“Project Warmth”–where people donate gently used coats at specially designated locations–check it out here –>>> http://www.projectwarmthkc.com/news-events/  .  Well, Cheryl Locke’s third graders do not live in the Kansas City Metro area, they live on the Pine Ridge Reservation, and hence will not be receiving any coats or blankets from “Project Warmth.” Having learned that approximately half of Ms. Locke’s students have no winter coats at all –that’s right these children have no coats to wear for a winter in South Dakota–I figured it’s worth putting out a call for a few coats for them.  So if your child is getting a coat upgrade this winter please consider sharing their outgrown winter wear with a coatless child. There’s no donation button. There’s no middleman. There’s just Cheryl Locke’s address, coat sizes and eight children in need of some winterizing like the little one in Yi-Ching Lin’s photograph. Thank you.

1-boy size 14/16
2-boy size 14/16
3-boy size 14/16
4-boy size 14/16
5-boy size small, one size below 14/16

6-girl size 10/12
7-girl size 10/12
8-girl size 10/12

If you can share a gently used winter coat, please mail it directly to:

Cheryl Locke

P.O. Box 264

Porcupine, SD  57772

Link to Yi-Ching Lin’s “width” http://yichinglin.com/2011/02/03/width/

POST UPDATE:   This particular Coat Crusade is Complete thanks to the Volunteers at the New American Shakespeare Tavern. See the Huzzahs! post for them. But if you’ve got coats which need children,  please see the One Spirit Needs list via the Okini list link here http://nativeprogress.org/index.php/en/ .

namaste

“Guerrilla Composting Madness” with The Urban Farming Guys! Got Leaves? Want Worms? These Dudes Have the Poop.

Ah some things just get better with time–like compost and the Urban Farming Guys’ permaculture antics in, of all places, Kansas City, Missouri. Who’d have thunk it in the city that wages war on its own trees? Mea culpa–indeed I have been remiss in not sharing all their wild and wonderful videos in a timely fashion. But today I’m on target as this is coming straight to you from my “inbox” this Sunday.  Whose farming in your city? Hmm? FYI, it is possible to subscribe to TheUrbanFarmingGuys on YouTube if you want to learn about Aquaponics, Morrels, Tilapia farming, Christmas Tree Safety and much more.

If you’re wondering just what’s possible regarding sustainable living in an urban setting, then you need to discover  these guys asap because they’re “making it so” all on their own steam.

The Guys have even been to Imphal, India–Seriously.

Explore The Guys Urban Farming at  http://theurbanfarmingguys.com/

 

Two Headed Cow and an auction–only at KKFI–radio like you’ve never heard it before. They guarantee it.

Hey, whose up for some Two Headed Cow? That’s music not milk, folks. FYI, KKFI streams online at www.kkfi.org so you can listen to everything from Democracy Now! to JAZZ while surfing the cyberspace seas. If you’re a fan of jazz, blues, indie, folk, Latino, chamber –as in chamber music not chamber-pot, yes, that’s right, KKFI plays chamber music–rockabilly, Native Spirit, alternative news, Sprouts, L.A. Theatre Works, Bioneers, and just about anything else that it’s possible to shake a musical — or grass-roots–stick at, then there’s plenty to discover at 90.1 FM KKFI Community Radio Like You’ve Never Heard It Before. Yes, I’m willing to bet that this radio is not the usual airwaves ear fare. There’s no corporate influence yanking KKFI’s 100,000 watts and online streaming.  This is radio that people support with their pennies, dimes and dollars. It’s not a fluke.  It’s 20 something years young and still growing. If you’re already wired for sound then what’s stopping you from engaging? But to get the Live Two Headed Cow and The John McKenna party gig I think you need to haul azz to Kansas City today. Enjoy.

Bidding on the KKFI Holiday Online Internet Auction begins Friday, November 30th. Think of it!  No crowds, no driving, no nasty weather, no checkout lines…PLUS you get great unique gifts at bargain prices (the bidding starts 1/3 of the retail value). 
This will be the BIGGEST and BEST KKFI Holiday Auction! This year, we have over 300 gifts to bid on, including…

  • Auto Service: Winterize your car
  • Auto servicing, including five oil changes, tire rotation and more
  • Introductory Airplane Flying Lessons
  • Full body massage
  • CD Extravaganza (over 100 CDs by local and national blues, rock, folk, jazz, reggae artists…many autographed)
  • Books (autographed by Amy Goodman, Chuck Haddix, more)
  • Restaurant Gift Certificates
  • Home cooked Mexican meal for six
  • Music lessons (blues harp lessons by Levee Town’s Jimmie Meade, more)
  • Home made baked goods for your holiday party
  • Eight hours handyman work
  • Live theater tickets (Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, American Heartland Theatre, Unicorn Theatre, Coterie Theater, 
  • Knucklehead Concert Tickets, Folly Theater Concert Tickets, Gem Theater Concert Tickets 

You can also show your support by donating goods and/or services to the KKFI Holiday Auction.  For example, maybe there are treasures in your basement or attic that you no longer need; or you can offer to bake a cake or pie; or offer your skills as a painter to paint a room or do a pedicure.    

 

If you are interested in donating goods or services to the holiday online auction, contact Bill Clause, KKFI Special Events Coordinator, (816) 994-7869 or email BillC@kkfi.org.

 

KKFI Holiday Party Features Barbecue, Liquid Refreshments, and Live Music by The John McKenna Band and Two Headed Cow
Two Headed Cow It’s the last Thursday in November. Thanksgiving is over and before long, it’s Kwanzaa, Hanukkah, Winter Solstice and, oh yeah, Chrsitmas.  TIME TO PARTY!
KKFI’s holiday party begins at 6pm at KKFI Studios. 39th & Main, KCMO, with barbecue and drinks,  followed by LIVE music featuring Two Headed Cow and The John McKenna Band. 
Holiday shopping Alert:
New CDs for Sale!
What do the bands Two Headed Cow and The John McKenna Band have in common? In addition to playing great music, both bands have new CDs for sale.
Tickets: $5 Door (barbecue, drinks and CDs extra)
KKFI 90.1 FM Community Radio | 3901 Main St. | Suite 203 | Kansas City | MO | 64111

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