Purpose? Who has one? Where do we find them?

A few days ago I caught  a rumor via Bearspawprint that there’s a music theme of Purpose on the docket.  Purpose has many faces and takes many forms. It’s not always easy to discern when you’re searching for one.  I’ve found it surprisingly challenging to reference music thematically concerned with ‘purpose’ that had meaning for moi.  Perhaps something is a tad askew in my braincase  these days? Perhaps the problem has been with my sense of purpose? Maybe I’m just out of the swing of blogging? Maybe my purposes have all gone haywire one time too many?

At any rate, here’s my purpose music and film menu for the moment.

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I Aim to Misbehave ~ Serenity ~ Soundtrack, instrumental.

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Movie scene to go with music. I Aim to Misbehave – Serenity film speech scene–Mal plans to rock the big bad boys’ boats big time.

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The Saint Patrick’s Battalion ~ Battalion de San Patricio ~ Damn, just when you think you’ve got a handle on American history the Irish come along and kick the slops bucket.

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Battlestar Galactica – Adama’s speech for the mission to rescue Hera Agathon–Helo and Sharon’s Human/Cylon child.

150,000 years ago there was a child born out in space and she changed everything by simply be-ing.

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Some doctors practice medicine primarily for profit, especially in the American Medical system, and others have different purposes in their minds.  Could a real House thrive and survive? I wonder.

Teardrop – Massive Attack ~ House MD Theme

Love, love is a verb
Love is a doing word
Fearless on my breath
Gentle impulsion
Shakes me makes me lighter
Fearless on my breath

Teardrop on the fire
Fearless on my breath

Nine night of matter
Black flowers blossom
Fearless on my breath
Black flowers blossom
Fearless on my breath

Teardrop on the fire
Fearless on my breath

Water is my eye
Most faithful mirror
Fearless on my breath
Teardrop on the fire of a confession
Fearless on my breath
Most faithful mirror
Fearless on my breath

Teardrop on the fire
Fearless on my breath

You’re stumbling in the dark
You’re stumbling in the dark

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The Snow Walker — Pilot’s plane takes a nosedive in the Alaskan wilderness and he is rewired for survival purposes by a young Inuit woman.  If you haven’t seen this film, you’re missing out on a great story.

I’m not sure how well any of this is working, but this purpose has been served as is.

For more Purpose-full music theme links I encourage you to visit Bear’s blogcasa –> at http://bearspawprint.wordpress.com/2014/09/25/purpose-music-themes/

Earth Sensual Saturday a la Nahko Bear (Medicine for the People) Aloha Ke Akua

Lyrics and download link posted here:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsgP8LkEopM

*Original footage was used for a series of commercials called Estrellas del Bicentenario, which was part of the Bicentennial celebration intended to reflect the natural beauty of Mexico to the world. Created by Pedro Torres, Diego Pernía and the Mates Group. It aired in 2010 on Televisa.

The Urban Farming Guys do Aquaponics at Orphanage in Oaxaca, Mexico

Discover The Urban Farming Guys at  http://theurbanfarmingguys.com/about

Another way is underway–now.

How-to, to follow.

 

 

Find “The Bridge” and see what you think about crossing borders.

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Maria Elena Fernandez for NBC News “‘The Bridge’ Crosses New Territory to Explore US-Mexico border issues.”

http://news.ca.msn.com/top-stories/the-bridge-crosses-new-territory-to-explore-us-mexico-border-issues

 

Anyone who has been visiting my blogcasa for any length of time knows that I very very seldom give any blogcasa space to television in any venue. That said, I do encourage anyone interested in good realistic drama that takes on serious issues to at least give the new show on FX, “The Bridge”, half a viewing chance. I caught the pilot on Hulu before it aired and was impressed enough to want to see the next episode. Fernandez’ piece linked above gives an in-depth look which says a lot of things that crossed my mind as I viewed the pilot. I was especially intrigued by the inclusion of the ongoing murders of young women and girls in Juarez which began in 1993 and now numbers over 450 (more). Yes, that’s right hundreds of women of the same physical description have been tortured, raped and murdered and no one in law enforcement has done anything about it. Hmm. Gee, I wonder what would be done if they were pretty little blonde girls found in the basements of their own homes?  Tiny beauty queens have had more news coverage than all the Women of Juarez together.

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Amalia Ortiz, spoken word artist, The Women of Juarez

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Okay FX has gotten my attention. Will “The Bridge” keep it enough to get me watching online? I don’t know. But I do know that something needs to be done to bridge the cultural, political, economic, spiritual differences between people living so close and yet so far apart in their minds. We need to value and care for each other no matter the color of our skins, our ages, our genders, and we need to do it now.  If this new show opens even one mind to some truth and reality, then it will have accomplished something of value.  I’m curious if television will find some of its potential power via this show. I’m going to  give it some of my valuable time if it does.

 

Keith Miller Art link to Over 450 Women Have Been Murdered in Ciudad Juarez and 600 are Missing

http://www.keith-miller.com/curatorial/juarez/pages/about.html

 

Site for The Bridge

http://www.fxnetworks.com/thebridge

 

 

 

Illegal by Bettina Restrepo–Are your papers in order?

     What would you do if you were a girl seriously wanting your father for your fifteenth birthday, quienceanera, and he’d suddenly gone silent in a strange land called Houston?

Bettina Restrepo’s Illegal places readers smack dab in young Nora’s desperate world of failing grapefruit orchard, dying village and dangerous journey to the not very welcoming land of Texas. In Houston the buildings grow tall while keeping people small and insignificant. Deepening poverty and increasing concern about the silence of Nora’s father from the land of opportunity drive the young girl and her mother into making a desperate search to a place where calling the police to report an assault is not a viable option.  No one wants to leave the once thriving village but survival dictates desperate measure for desperate times when the tax man gets impatient.

Love and family values push three generations of Mexican women to leave behind all they know and hold dear to search for the man missing from their daily lives. Deliberately or not, Restrepo presents anew the mythic threesome of the maiden, matron and crone in the forms of Nora, her mother and grandmother as they are forced to confront the reality of the economic and social death of their Mexican village. The grapefruits rotting in the once prosperous orchard reinforce the mythic imagery of a dying land unable to support the people. Even the village bank scarcely has any purpose other than to employ Hector.

    Illegal is a dark reality check of a young adult novel that many American adults would benefit from reading. What’s the Dream Act about? Who wants it and why? Well, Nora’s story might provide some clues to the answers. Hungry stomachs often go hand in hand with hungry young minds. The need to make a meaningful life wherever you find your feet planted is real and valid cause for concern. Unless they’ve experienced poverty in America many young readers might have trouble entering Nora’s world where learning to speak English is a vital concern surpassed by the need to help her mother keep it together in a hostile urban jungle where girls beat each other for entrance into gangs.

Restrepo does her best to get readers into and keep them in Nora’s changing world.  It’s not an easy task. To help raise cultural awareness she incorporates Espanol into the novel. There’s a decent little glossary at the back for readers who have no idea that cartas means a pack of cards, cabrito is a baby goat, and that a coyote can be something other than an animal–a human smuggler. Illegal is a solid novel which pulls no punches yet works to be accessible to young adult readers who are curious about what’s going with other young people beyond the boundaries of their own private worlds.

Now what would have happened if the Native Americans had thought to demand identity papers and immigration documents for all the white European invaders searching for land and riches in the New World?  Imagine that.

Visit Bettina Restrepo at http://bettinarestrepo.com/

Find Illegal and more young adult fiction published by Katherine Tegen Books:   http://www.yabookscentral.com/component/jreviews/tag/publisher/katherine-tegen-books/

 

The Iguana Tree by Michel Stone — OMG! There is hope for contemporary American Fiction!

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“Tonight Hector  would call Lilia and tell of the funny gringo’s joke, of the alligator who lived beside the beautiful river beyond the trees, and of the senora’s skills in driving the tree-digging machine. He’d describe the colorful sunset and the way the pale full moon rose above the field just as it rose in their village. He’d tell her of the optimism brimming inside him, his confidence in their future, in the reality of his dreams for them.”

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      O hell, I’ve been on a review whirl-a-gig ride just long enough now to wonder what if I can pull off a decent enough conversation to actually encourage anyone out there in cyberspace to read something really worth reading.  Yes, I want to encourage folks looking for contemporary American fiction with substance and bite to consider The Iguana Tree by Michel Stone via Hub City Press, an independent publisher flourishing in South Carolina.  This title came my via one of Roxie’s posts and the title intrigued me enough to put in a library request which plopped Stone’s tome in my greedy reading palms within a day. I like The Iguana Tree very much because it’s a dam good piece of writing.  Now I doubt that statement will get anyone else scrambling to lay hands on a copy. So let’s try this: I would like to force read this book to that Huppenthal dictator of Public Education in the state of Arizona where some folks don’t want others getting any ideas about their own self-worth. Or this:  If you have no clue why the English Language Only movement is insulting and doomed to failure in the U.S. of A–then The  Iguana Tree might be a first step in comprehending the issues of migration–legal and illegal–and why people from Mexico risk their lives to come to this not so sweet land of opportunity. Or this:  Many folks fear hordes of illegal immigrants so much that they think building walls will steam the flow northward. Well those folks need to think again about that wall building. Guess what, it’s not going to keep anyone anywhere. If you read The Iguana Tree you’ll understand better why such walls are useless to prevent desperate people from migrating to where they perceive there are greener grasses agrowing. O and by the way, even if your family has been on American soil for 500 years–they’re still all from immigrants who came here for many of the same reasons espoused by modern-day immigrants–and an argument can be made that unless you’re a full-blooded member of one of the 500 plus Indigenous Nations that you’re an invasive non-native species that emigrated from another homeland nowhere near Plymouth Rock.  How am I doing on that patriotically offensive scale rating so far? Give me more words and I may crank it up a few more notches.  Hey, my people didn’t settle stateside until around 1914 when they decided they’d had enough of living in the middle of one of Europe’s favorite battlegrounds. Yet I’m aware that even knowledge of one’s own family history of migration does not breed compassion nor understanding in the minds and hearts of many modern Americans who are threatened by anyone not like themselves. Or this:  So I ask do, you know who picks those strawberries, avocados and tomatoes we all enjoy finding at the American grocery store all year round? Hint, not the sort of folks who used to work in Detroit building automobiles–and I doubt those folks would work for the wages or under the conditions of migrant workers.  Furthermore, if the folks who put their lives, hopes and dreams in the hands of the human variety of coyotes (who give the real critter by the same name an EVIL reputation) could make decent livings in their places of origin I doubt they’d be motivated to experience the adventures of Hector and Lilia in The Iguana Tree. I sure as hell would not.  I don’t think I’d be willing to place bets on finding employment with the likes of Lucas and Elizabeth in South Carolina. These are people who seriously need Hector’s willingness to work hard as much as he needs the employment opportunity their tree farm offers.   

     The Iguana Tree does not offer up any nice neat little packaged political economic solutions. What it does offer is some insight into the hearts and minds of real people all trying very hard to do more than just survive in a harsh world full of obstacles and hazardous conditions.  If you don’t care about someone in this book then there’s something wrong with your internal tic tocker for sure. It’s your heart Michel Stone is trying to touch with this story of bitter hopes.  Stone writes deftly and candidly about the horrors of border crossings, lives lived in fear of deportation, families separated, sudden injury, death, identity issues, language and cultural barriers. Being an illegal immigrant in the United States is no picnic in the park.  The Iguana Tree presents the high cost of “coming to America” as such that this qualifies as a modern shop of horrors–exploitation, greed, corruption, rape, child theft. What truly is painful is that this well crafted work of fiction reflects an all too real grim reality.  Stone softens The Iguana Tree with elements of friendship, love, and relationships built on mutual benefit.  There is the suggestion that the only way to humanely deal with the issue of illegal immigration is with humanity and treating people as valuable in their own rights.  

     So I hope you soon meet Hector, Lilia, Miguel, Pablo, Lucas, Elizabeth, Carlos and Rosa.  If you’re an American wondering what the hell is going on at the border between Mexico and the United States maybe you’ll get a few ideas. I’m not saying you’ll like what you learn. But you might gain a sense of the human complexity of what motivates illegal migration. I seriously doubt The Iguana Tree will bore anyone.  It might make you want to visit Puerto Isadore or South Carolina–legally, of course.

     By the way, The Iguana Tree is a story about love.

        Hub City Press link http://www.hubcity.org/press/

       Roxie’s blog post regarding The Iguana Tree  http://roxieh.wordpress.com/2012/05/14/top-twos-day-physical-photos-and-layers/

 

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