A Quick and Dirty Review of Deborah Meyler’s ~The Bookstore~

*Public Domain Photo by Alexandre Duret-Lutz

Seldom have I ever been so on the fence regarding a book I’ve selected for a spot of easy reading than I was, and still am, as I’ve been with The Bookstore by Deborah Meyler.  After reading several pages at a random opening, I checked this novel out of my wonderful public library~ (side note: Everything under human control in the library is wonderful, though the departments ruled by computer intelligence are quite questionable of late. Artificial Intelligence is driving the staff a tad mad due to its distinct lack of common sense regarding book culling. For example, who would remove the second book in a young adult fantasy thriller series thus leaving a gap between volume one and three? What sense does that make? All it does is discourage the would be reader because the story is now incomplete. Okay enough of this developing issue.) Yeah, I promised a quick review for everyone on the cyber-space run.  Let’s get to the good stuff first: This is an easy-going read writing wise–you will not have to work through any deviously poetic complex sentence structures. The supporting cast of characters connected to the bookstore are very engaging creations–and mainly male. You get a decent sense of New York City’s never sleeping city atmosphere. There are interesting references and allusions to great art and great books. There’s a slightly developed commentary on the demise of independent bookstores being put out of business by corporate run big box book retailers. This is a nice big plus because it supports the assertion that Esme, our thoroughly modern young woman on the academic art history move, has a decently educated mind in good working order–except when it comes to the entire concept of pregnancy. She’s clueless like so many young people these days when it comes to her biological nature beyond sex for fun.  But I won’t hold that against her.  She does have many good qualities along the tune of -> Yes, ladies it can be very cool to be well read, intelligent and interested in much more than the moron box taking center stage in many living rooms. For the most part I like Esme very much. Hang on to “for the most part” –the not most part when I don’t care for–or comprehend–Esme is part of what still has me on the fence regarding this book.

What’s got me on the fence? Esme’s love interest, Mitchell. For the life of me I can’t figure out what this young woman finds to love in this cold-hearted bastard.  Being handsome is not enough–statues, male models, actors and non-famous dudes on the street can be very good-looking–but women don’t fall for them just because of the outer packaging–or do they?  I guess some do. Maybe Esme is supposed to be one of those ladies? Perhaps it’s because she’s twenty-three and has a libido in good working order? I’m serious here, folks. if  Meyler had given Mitchell a character profile beyond handsome economics professor from a wealthy family –I’m sure some of you are arguing that’s plenty, but it’s not in this context. Esme has too much going for her to be picked up by a handsome sexual predator running amok in NYC. Or does she?  Maybe there’s something amiss with the young Miss? I’m still not sure after finishing the book–which I nearly gave up on several times because I had such serious trouble buying this particular woman and man connection.  All the good things, bookstore, homeless people, Stella, George, Luke etc. kept me reading though–and the hope that Esme might get a clue or two regarding the man using her for nothing more than satisfying his own very manipulative dysfunctional ego. It’s not like she doesn’t have plenty of other men to compare this asshole to in order to see the light.

Mitchell’s character is a cliché in the extreme. Hence, I dislike him immensely. Disliking him is probably what Meyler had in mind. Problem is, he’s so dislikeable that it’s hard comprehending why Esme loves him. There’s nothing even remotely loveable about this guy as he is portrayed. If there’s some unwritten or edited out part of this novel that is loitering with intent to explain Esme’s feelings for this man, then it needs to get edited into the novel. Yes, women–and men–fall for the wrong sort of people all the time. True enough. But stating this guy has charm and giving him none at any point in time makes Esme come off as a complete dunce.  It would help matters considerably if the reader got some glimpse of what lures Esme into loving this man. Yeah, the slam dunk sex foreplay in the women’s restroom fails to do that for me.  It works for sexual attraction, but not for emotional attachment and involvement. Hmm. Maybe that’s Meyler’s point–that people confuse physical sexual attraction with emotional love attraction? Maybe.  I’m not sure.

Oh–yes, Esme does have alternative love interest choices which appear to operate on a more positive level–or could. There are hints which I won’t spoil here for any interested might be readers.  In many ways this is story about dealing with such relationship scenario. Perhaps it’s a modernized version of a very old cautionary tale for young women.  It certainly works in that regard. Hmm, maybe this review is getting me off the fence as I air my concerns here. Maybe.

If anyone has run through The Bookstore’s very accessible pages and cares to comment on my fencing–please don’t hesitate to share your thoughts about any chapter or verse in the novel. So, was this quick and dirty enough? Oh a little short on the dirty–hmm–consider a toothbrush standing in for a vibrator. How’s that for a little dirty?

*

Meyler’s author page at http://authors.simonandschuster.com/deborah-meyler/408315626

What’s in Betty Medsger’s ‘ The Burglary’? Crow-bars, COINTERLPRO and Naughty FBI Spy Games.

what lives in a book

inked leaves unfurling words

secrets detecting

&

 Hmm, how’s that poem working for you? May not make the publishing book grade, but it does the introduction rites job today. Sort of. Books are strange things. Never know just what you’ll find between their covers–hard copy or electronic, it makes no difference when the words are what make the mental meat of the matter. I have no clue how good or bad Medsger’s brand spanking new book reads. Yet. It’s literally a NEW release by Random House-as in publication dated yesterday.  Ironically the historical story it features is decades old. New book for an old untold story about American citizens taking things into their own hands in order to get to the truth of what matters.  According to the interview on Democracy Now! this morning, the newspaper media nearly failed them. The truth was very HOT to handle. Some political folks so feared the FBI that they turned their backs on the right to information regarding illegal activities by the FBI. One mailing of copied documents never reached its destination. Can we say “intercepted”? Or maybe just an honest mistake on the part of the postal service. I wouldn’t bet a penny on that.

Clearly history is repeating itself in current events. The stakes are just as high regarding freedom and civil liberties. A portion of the public is very paranoid. J. Edgar Hoover would be proud of the media spin on all things of politics regarding the military industrial complex and corporate personhood for inducing much paranoia–according the old documents stolen and “released.” Some times it’s just no fun having a theory proven. My next observation might seem like a side issue, but it’s not. How many ‘cop’ shows are on television? How many feature all sorts of fancy surveillance techno toys? How many feature terrorist threats week after week? How many evoke sympathy for the hardworking agents no matter what their flaws? Have you gotten used to the sound of gunfire from watching crime shows on television? Ever notice the lack of emotion from the people doing the shooting and the characters giving and recieving the news that someone has been killed?

Side note: At the opposite end are the medical heroes who do everything they can to save lives and then seem to suffer a sense of loss when their patients die. Hmm. I’ve yet to encounter any such doctor in my life experience. I’ve managed to send a couple running in a panic. I guess that proved those well educated individuals were human after all.

“Excuse me, doctor, but that’s not his sense of humor.  At the moment, he really thinks you’re all aliens out to kill him. He’s a lot stronger than he looks. I advise exercising caution when handling.” Watch doctor run back to ER room.

Back to the regular word flow:

I wonder if there’s a television program in the works about TSA folks in order to show us just how good all their intentions are as they intimidate, strip search, x-ray, hassle and belittle people everywhere with impunity in order to keep people safe.  The irony of TSA is a steak so thick an axe is needed to cut the meat.

What’s your paranoia meter reading? I know people who freak out every time there’s a plane crash and others who fear the sight of police people wearing gun holsters. I also know a fair number of folks who don’t give a flying f&*^ about anything except their daily routine and money-making. As long at those boats are not rocked, all is well in their universe.

Is there a safety lock somewhere?

Is this piece fully loaded?

Careful with the drones~

Make sure they fly right~

Status quo depends on the system flowing, flowing, flowing…..

*

The Context:

Stealing J. Edgar Hoover’s Secrets

The New York Times

The Book:

The Burglary by Betty Medsger

click cover for Random House

*

The Motive:

“It Was Time To Do More Than Protest”

democracynow·

Published on Jan  8, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org – One of the great mysteries of the Vietnam War era has been solved. On March 8, 1971, a group of activists — including a cabdriver, a day care director and two professors — broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania. They stole every document they found and then leaked many to the press, including details about FBI abuses and the then-secret counter-intelligence program to infiltrate, monitor and disrupt social, political movements, nicknamed COINTELPRO. Calling themselves, the Citizen’s Commission to Investigate the FBI, no one was ever caught for the break-in. The burglars’ identities remained a secret until this week when they finally came forward to take credit for the caper that changed history. Today we are joined by three of them — John Raines, Bonnie Raines and Keith Forsyth; their attorney, David Kairys; and Betty Medsger, the former Washington Post reporter who first broke the story of the stolen FBI documents in 1971 and has now revealed the burglars’ identities in her new book, “The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI.”
Watch part 1 of this interview: http://youtu.be/GMWuJipChs0

For more of the interview and links to related items –> http://www.democracynow.org/2014/1/8/it_was_time_to_do_more

&

Radio:

NPR  coverage –> http://www.npr.org/2014/01/07/260302289/the-secret-burglary-that-exposed-j-edgar-hoovers-fbi

How’s your day? What’s in your mailbox? Have you fumigated lately?

Yes, I am looking forward to reading Medsger’s book.

No Trick, These Books Really are Free Treats From World Book Night Peeps.

Yes, you too can share and spread the joy of reading with free books from the wonderful people who run World Book Night.  What are you waiting for? Just fill out an application to be a Giver any time from now until January 5, 2014. Why wait? It’s not a scam. These are real books and we get to give them to real people.  It’s fun, it’s easy, it’ll make you smile. I guarantee it.

April 23rd Is World Book Night

World Book Night site –>> http://www.us.worldbooknight.org/

Browse the Books for 2014  —>> http://www.us.worldbooknight.org/books/2014

How it works:

Each year, 30- 35 books are chosen by an independent panel of librarians and booksellers. The authors of the books waive their royalties and the publishers agree to pay the costs of producing the specially-printed World Book Night U.S. editions. Bookstores and libraries sign up to be community host locations for the volunteer book givers.

After the book titles are announced, members of the public apply to personally hand out 20 copies of a particular title in their community. World Book Night U.S. vets the applications, and the givers are chosen based on their ability to reach light and non-readers. The selected givers choose a local participating bookstore or library from which to pick up the 20 copies of their book, and World Book Night U.S. delivers the books to these host locations.

Givers pick up their books in the week before World Book Night. On April 23rd, they give their books to those who don’t regularly read and/or people who don’t normally have access to printed books, for reasons of means or geography. 

WBN

wbnamerica

Book List for 2014

WBN

2014 Book List    

To download the list with ISBN’s please click here.

The Zookeeper’s Wife by Diane Ackerman

Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain

The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

After the Funeral by Agatha Christie

The Ruins of Gorlan: The Ranger’s Apprentice, Book 1 by John Flanagan

Hotel at the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

Hotel at the Corner of Bitter and Sweet (Large Print edition) by Jamie Ford

The Lighthouse Road by Peter Geye

The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

Wait Till Next Year by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

The Dog Stars by Peter Heller

Hoot by Carl Hiaasen

Pontoon by Garrison Keillor

Same Difference by Derek Kirk Kim

Enchanted by Alethea Kontis

Miss Darcy Falls in Love by Sharon Lathan

Bobcat and Other Stories by Rebecca Lee

Young Men and Fire by Norman Maclean

Tales of the City by Armistead Maupin

Waiting to Exhale by Terry McMillan

Sunrise Over Fallujah by Walter Dean Myers

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

The Botany of Desire by Michael Pollan

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

When I was Puerto Rican by Esmeralda Santiago

Cuando Era Puertorriqueña by Esmeralda Santiago

Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

Where’d You Go, Bernadette (Large Print edition) by Maria Semple

Wild by Cheryl Strayed

Presumed Innocent by Scott Turow

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein

This Boy’s Life by Tobias Wolff

100 Best-Loved Poems edited by Philip Smith

*

Yeah, right now Catch 22 is at the top of my short list of books I’d love to share. For 2013 I gave out 20 copies of The Phantom Tollbooth.  What about you?  What book from this list would you like to give someone to read? Join and give.

William Shakespeare’s Star Wars plays nicely with Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Will AZ ban this yarn of The Bard? Hmm.

What’s on your bedside reading table at the moment? Hmm? Two books, among others, are on mine.  Let’s laugh and cry a little between the realities they each present. Oh yes, they both deal with the very real quest for freedom of the mind–the body, and the heart and soul of humankind. Which books free your mind?
~
William Shakespeare’s Star Wars, Verily, A New Hope by Ian Doescher
*
http://quirkbooks.com/ShakespeareStar…

Return once more to a galaxy far, far away with this sublime retelling of George Lucas’s epic Star Wars in the style of the immortal Bard of Avon. The saga of a wise (Jedi) knight and an evil (Sith) lord, of a beautiful princess held captive and a young hero coming of age, Star Wars abounds with all the valor and villainy of Shakespeare’s greatest plays. ‘Tis a tale told by fretful droids, full of faithful Wookiees and fearstome stormtroopers, signifying…pretty much everything.Reimagined in glorious iambic pentameter—and complete with twenty gorgeous Elizabethan illustrations–William Shakespeare’s Star Wars will astound and edify Rebels and Imperials alike. Zounds! This is the book you’re looking for.IAN DOESCHER has loved Shakespeare since eighth grade and was born 45 days after Star Wars Episode IV was released. He has a B.A. in Music from Yale University, a Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School, and a Ph.D. in Ethics from Union Theological Seminary. Ian lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife and two sons. This is his first book.

Hell, yes, it’s a lot of fun!

Star Wars is about oppressed people fighting ?????? Come on….

What’s Shakespeare got to do with banned books in Arizona?  Hmmm….oh yeah, the oppressed…rebels, intellectual freedom etc.

More Banned Book Fun!
 *
Banned Books : Pedagogy of the Oppressed – Virtual Arizona
Arizona Banned BooksArizona Banned Books
Jorge reads a selection from Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire

Join us!  Add your one to two minute reading from one of the confiscated titles (see list below) #arizonareadout

Banned Books List compiled by Debbie Reese :
http://library.csun.edu/guides/arizon…

More of these banned books videos here –>> http://www.youtube.com/user/ArizonaReadOut/videos
Discover what some folks in AZ fear so much that they’ve banned these books from classrooms.
pedagogy of the oppressed by Paulo Freire
*
~~~
Willam Shakespeare’s Star Wars
Quirk Books –>> http://quirkbooks.com/ShakespeareStarWars
Hey, I know a woman with the last name of Quirk….verily, I do!
~~
Pedagogy of the Oppressed
Bloomsbury Publishing –>>
http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/pedagogy-of-the-oppressed-9780826412768/
New site developing regading Pedagogy of the Oppressed http://www.pedagogyoftheoppressed.com/

Into the Interconnectedness of All Things? Then explore ‘Cloud Atlas’ from one mind shore to another.

I’ve encountered a few folks who can’t seem to make heads or tails of this film. Does that signify some fundamental dysfunction with their brain-pans or something else? I have no idea. Some people find this film too confusing to follow. Others seem blind to its subject/theme/ideas — much like the people who complain about the ‘details’ in The Lone Ranger while missing out on the huge outraged SHOUT against injustice the film serves. Yes, The Lone Ranger is much more than a fun gig when it takes on genocide, exploitation of everyone and everything, and the military – industrial complex. If you can’t ‘see’ that then perhaps we might have a little film dissection course online at some point in time.  But–Cloud Atlas is the name of this post game. Yes, I’ve beat the drum for this film previously. And I’ll probably beat it again in the future. It’s not a perfect film–but it is a truly GREAT film for all it endeavors to accomplish. It’s not an accident that it is the film it is.

Enjoy the trailer.

Anyone have any other film to recommend that even comes close to the quality of Cloud Atlas? Come on, I know there are all sorts of things going on in the universe about which I have no clue. Share and share alike, please.

OOps, yes, Cloud Atlas is also a book by David Mitchell.  —>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_Atlas_(novel)   Yep, the Wikipedia piece is rather interesting all by itself.  Hmm, something about the first edition cover art is just so engaging to my eye.

 

The Dark Mountain Project — Uncivilisation Festival 15-18 August — Care for a little taste of reality? It’s the end of the world as we know it . . . .

OOh how about a little walk on the DARK side of reality? Hmm? How about a visit to The Dark Mountain? Why not? Turn yourself around, inside out, and upside down a few times and let the imagination marbles roll where they will. What’s an Uncivilisation Festival? Smile. No, it’s not Mad Max down under fun and games. Hardly. But you know, the Brothers Grimm just might have been interested……

The machine is stuttering and the engineers are in panic. They are wondering if perhaps they do not understand it as well as they imagined. They are wondering whether they are controlling it at all or whether, perhaps, it is controlling them.’

– From Uncivilisation: the Dark Mountain Manifesto

The Dark Mountain Project is a network of writers, artists and thinkers who have stopped believing the stories our civilisation tells itself. We see that the world is entering an age of ecological collapse, material contraction and social and political unravelling, and we want our cultural responses to reflect this reality rather than denying it.

The Project grew out of a feeling that contemporary art and literature were failing to respond honestly or adequately to the scale of our entwined ecological, economic and social crises. We believe that writing and art have a crucial role to play in coming to terms with this reality, and in questioning its foundations.

[note: wp, my computer, the ‘machine at large’ are not cooperating with the production of this post regarding quotes, indents, or images. I apologize for any infractions that result from the posting of this information. Cheerio.]

 

Info via Paul Kingsnorth, whose new book I’ve supported via Unbound, has a new post on the blog, “If You Go Down to the Woods Today”. regarding the upcoming final Uncivilisation Festival. Anyone interested in another way of living and perceiving our world and its future may want to skip down the cyber rabbit hole and see what’s up in jolly old England near Petersfield, Hampshire. Or if you’ve just got some sweet kitty kitty mojo curiosity drop yourself in for a look around The Dark Mountain Project page where Kingsnorth’s blog is posted http://dark-mountain.net/blog/if-you-go-down-to-the-woods-today

As posted on the page:

“Tickets are selling fast for our fourth – and last! – Uncivilisation festival. Uncivilistion 2013 takes place from 15-18 August. Visit the festival website for more details.”

 

Paul Kingsnorth’s book, The Wake, on Unbound http://unbound.co.uk/books/the-wake

Up for some ice today? How about Alexis M. Smith’s Glaciers?

Hmm, it’s Sensual Saturday and sometimes that means a musical posting. Tell you what, if you click the link to Glaciers by Alexis M. Smith there’s music at the other end via the video playing on the novel’s homepage.  Music covered now, okay?  Now for those of you searching for something sensual for your Saturday there’s this lovely little novel just stuffed full of stories of scopes large and small.  Alexis M. Smith has inked a wickedly sweet little tome with an expanse far beyond its 174 pocket-sized pages.  Some folks might be inclined to savor this book tidbit by tiny tidbit over a week’s time. Some other folks, like myself, may savor it whole in the course of a single day of word craft pleasure-seeking.  While there’s nothing erotic about Smith’s Tin House Books publication, her prose elicits a certain sort of response some of us experience when stimulated by wordcraft so easy-going that one has no sense of any effort on the writer’s part at all. Glaciers reads like gently flowing stream water encountering a rapid or two along the way to keep you on your toes.

So what’s it about? Love, longing, the past, the future, Amsterdam, war, families, Portland, storytelling, Alaska and glaciers of several sorts. Smith writes about a young woman, a young man, a library, and a war.  Yet another anti-war book of the most subtle yet most earnest kind.

    Her eyes close, and she begins to drift. She thinks of these things: Spoke and the war; the oil in Alaska and the oil in the Middle East’ the glaciers melting’ and the water that connects them all. the glaciers will melt and the water will rise. Everything will be washed though. All the young lovers in their hats and party dresses. All the plane trees and the elms. All the tall houses. All the narrow brick lanes and city squares. Glaciers take the cities, cities take the architecture, the architecture takes the bodies. (p. 151)

Glaciers melt. Glaciers are melting.  Keep in mind ever-expanding scopes.

What postcards are you saving? Why?

Alexis M. Smith  http://alexismsmith.com/

Tin House Books http://www.tinhouse.com/home

Take note: I discovered this literary delight via World Book Night 2013–it’s one of the selections for the free books being given away.  What a wonderful reading gift!  http://www.us.worldbooknight.org/books/2013

Some ‘My Lai’ every day in Vietnam–So went the War Game according to Nick Turse in “Kill Anything That Moves, The Real American War in Vietnam”

 Recently I shared with some friendlies that I was reading Nick Turse’s Kill Anything That Moves, The Real American War in Vietnam. So far only one friendly has responded to my friendly email and that was basically to share the information that they had already read some of the many books on the Vietnam War–hence, implying that they weren’t interested in reading another tome.  So I thought, yes, why indeed would anyone whose has attempted to make some sense out of a seemingly senseless waste of lives want to read Turse’s latest book?  Why? I believe the answer involves the Vietnamese Civilians all too often callously dismissed as Casualties of War.  Damn this sounds familiar. Care to insert Afghanistan Casualties of War? Iraqi Casualties of War? Pick any war and couple it with casualties.  Civilians as totally expendable human resources is not a new concept. It’s been around a very long time. By the way, if you think this doesn’t pertain to you in any way, shape or form, please do think again. Why? Because unless you are part of the military forces you are indeed a civilian to be treated with absolute contempt by those with no regard for the tenets of the Geneva Convention–that nice little old-fashioned little agreement about how to treat people during any modern war.  Somehow I doubt the Geneva Convention agreement is part of either a  drone’s programming or of the human charting its course. It certainly has no value to those who send soldiers to wars. Hmm.  Might it be helpful to consider the military forces at work in Vietnam as precursors to current drones? Perhaps. But there are serious limitations to drones conducting military strikes as drones are incapable of rape and torture. At least I think they are –so far.  Have no doubt that some computer programmer somewhere is hard at work solving these drone limitations. Too bad that creative brainpower isn’t invested in something like combating pollution.

Now back to Turse’s tome which is all about the standard operating procedure of murder, rape and torture  of Vietnamese civilians whose “hearts and minds” were supposedly being saved from the communist menace.   Why read this book?

   In Vietnam, where the “lives” of the deceased are believed to be inextricably intertwined with those of the living, it is thought that those who die a “bad death” may be forced to suffer as “wandering ghosts,” trapped in a limbo between our world  and the land of the dead. In this shadow land, they forever reexperience the violence that ended their lives, unable to attain peace until the living truly acknowledge them and the fate they suffered.3 The idea of such wandering ghosts is an unfamiliar one for most Americans, but we should not be too quick to dismiss it. The crimes committed in American’s name in Vietnam were our “bad death,” and they have never been adequately faced. As a result, they continue to haunt our society in profound and complex ways. (p. 261)

Turse makes the case that it’s high time Americans quit turning a blind eye to the dark side of our history in war, politics and business.  It’s time we all took a long hard straight on look at the military industrial complex that strives to rule the world with an iron fist. With knowledge, however nasty and unpleasant it may be, comes power.  There’s a very important war emerging in the world involving everyone on the Earth. It helps to know one’s enemy.  The enemy has left quite a few revealing footprints. Some of them lay in the history of the war waged on the children, women and men of Vietnam.  There are older footprints, newer ones and ones currently underway.  What will it take for “us” to change how we view casualties of war–and war itself? What will it take for “us” to refuse to play the game of murder, rape, torture of our fellow human beings just because some power-hungry egomaniacs demand we play? Don’t forget “we” are all totally expendable–our sons, husbands, wives, daughters, mothers, fathers, all our relations are absolutely of no account in the war games.

So yes, read Nick Turse’s book — and learn why the Winter Soldiers threw their medals at Congress.   It’s not a fun read. It’s not enjoyable. It’s not a “feel good” book.  It is an important book.

http://www.nickturse.com/books.html

Democracy Now!  www.democracynow.org

Written transcript of interview http://www.democracynow.org/2013/1/15/kill_anything_that_moves_new_book

Geneva Convention http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geneva_Conventions

 

New Book Alert–“Kill Anything That Moves” by Nick Turse

new_book

   I confess I’m not really wanting to read Kill Anything That Moves, The Real American War in Vietnam, because it sounds like a truly horrific book, yet I feel a sense of obligation to read Nick Turse’s work.  Truth needs telling.  Just from watching Democracy Now!’s interview of Nick Turse it’s pretty clear this is about the dark side of human nature and that’s not pleasant ever to encounter.  Too often we think of war being an arena in which everything is allowed. Why is that? Why is it permissible for people to commit horrible transgressions against other human beings–women, men, children–during a state of war? Suicide is condemned in many cultures. To take control of one’s fate and decide whether or not one wishes to continue living is generally frowned upon.  Yet–it is acceptable to kill OTHERS–just not yourself.  Why is it “Okay” to kill other people during war or at other times? Why is it okay to rape and torture other people during war? Turse’s book delves into the atrocity as norm character of the Vietnam War.  I fear it reveals a great deal about human nature that we’d rather turn a blind eye to.  Yes, it’s been a long time since Vietnam. But there are ongoing wars. Has the conduct of war changed? Somehow I doubt it. I’m waiting for the time when some politicans declare war and everyone refuses to fight,  thereby putting an end to the insanity.

Nick Turse site http://www.nickturse.com/books.html

Democracy Now!  www.democracynow.org

Review forthcoming after I get my not so eager hands on Turse’s tome.  If anyone out there has already read the book–no fear of spoilers–feel free to hold forth on it via the comments.

namaste

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Red Wolf Journal

A literary compass for finding your voice..."You turn toward me, your lips move, wanting to speak."--Stephen Dobyns, "Wolves In The Street"

poet4justicedotwordpressdotcom

The poet can reach where the sun cannot. -HINDU PROVERBThe greatest WordPress.com site in all the land!

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Rezinate's Blog

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You can't stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.